Proposed SE bus network redesign

Posted: November 19, 2013 in Transport
Tags: , , , ,

Coogee and all suburbs South of Maroubra would lose direct bus access to the CBD outside of peak hour if the bus network redesign proposed as part of the CDB and South East Light Rail (CSELR) Environmental Impact Study (EIS) were implemented. The new network would instead operate with feeder buses to light rail interchanges at Kingsford and Randwick where passengers would make a cross platform transfer to a tram in order to continue their journey into the CBD.

Proposed changes to the bus network in SE Sydney once light rail begins operating in 2019. Click to enlarge. (Source: CSELR EIS Technical Paper 1 - Traffic Operations - Part B, p. 130)

Proposed changes to the bus network in SE Sydney once light rail begins operating in 2019. Click to enlarge. (Source: CSELR EIS Technical Paper 1 – Traffic Operations – Part B, p. 130)

Some buses will terminate shortly after these interchanges, but the majority will be re-routed to form cross-city links to destinations like Edgecliff, Sydney University via Redfern/Central, or Sydenham via Mascot. A few bus routes (such as UNSW express buses or the 373) will be elimiated entirely when their proposed routes would overlap entirely with another proposed route, while the M10 and M50 metrobuses will lose the Eastern Suburbs portion of their route.

Peak hour express buses that operate via the Eastern Distributor in the morning and Elizabeth Street in the afternoon will continue as normal, and the bus road along Anzac Parade and Alison Road will be retained to allow them to continue to travel through that portion of their route separated from private car traffic.

How increased frequencies can allow a transport network based on transfers to operate better than one based on direct services. Click on image for higher resolution. (Source: Queensland Government)

How increased frequencies can allow a transport network based on transfers to operate better than one based on direct services. Click on image for higher resolution. (Source: Queensland Government)

The new network operates will operate on the basis of connections involving trips on multiple vehicles, rather than direct journeys on a single vehicle, and will be hindered if frequencies are insufficient or if fare penalties remain for transfers for bus to tram or vice versa. However, if these two obstacles are not in place, then it will provide an improvement on the existing network, which provides good connections for anyone travelling to or from the CBD during peak hour, but often falls short for anyone making a cross-city journey or travelling outside of peak hour when frequencies generally drop to half hourly.

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Comments
  1. Greg Cameron says:

    The announcement of a possible Thames River airport 80km from London (SMH, 18 November) shows that governments are serious about taking aircraft noise out of big cities.

    But the fastest, lowest cost way to increase Sydney’s airport capacity is to expand the current Airport using the land occupied by Port Botany container terminal. There would be no need for a second airport at Badgery’s Creek. The passengers would be flying pigs.

    Close Sydney Airport. Build a major airport at Badgery’s Creek. Close Port Botany container terminal. Use both sites for residential re-development to help pay for the new airport. Take all container trucks off Sydney’s roads. Provide a world-class express rail service to the new airport by removing freight from the Sydney rail network. Build a freight rail bypass of Sydney between Glenfield and Newcastle. Rail all containers and all other northern freight between a container terminal at Newcastle and an intermodal terminal at Eastern Creek. Rail all southern freight to Eastern Creek. Ditch the intermodal terminals at Moorebank.

    Greg Cameron

  2. Alex says:

    This will set the cat among the pigeons, though as you say if frequencies are adequate and there isn’t a fare penalty for transfer between buses and light rail then it should improve the service – not only as you suggest outside peak hour but during it as well, as the trams on a largely dedicated right of way should have more consistent travel times.

    The second “if” is a big one though. Given the Government’s shortsighted decision to continue the fare penalty for transferring between bus and rail there is a question regarding where light rail sits. Is it to be considered part of the bus or rail network, or a separate mode with its own transfer penalties?

    Obviously the answer will have major implications particularly in the CESLR scenario where there will be major re routing of buses to interchange with tram services. If these arrangements are to make any sense then LR would be regarded as part of the bus fare system. On the other hand passengers on the Inner West LR may prefer integration with trains, given the extended line’s interchanges with the rail network at either end (as well as, sort of, at Lewisham).

  3. Greg Seeney says:

    I recall the rumour being that Light Rail and Buses will be considered one and the same for the purposes of Opal fares. This works well since changing vehicles will not be penalised if change occurs within 1 hour – the fare will be on distance between origin and destination as the crow flies. Weather this rumour turns out to be correct is the question!

  4. Lachlan says:

    Alex – when Bambul and I went to one of the events we were told that light rail was going to be treated as a bus for Opal purposes – so no fare penalties between bus and light rail (but there will obviously be a penalty to transfer between “bus” and heavy rail).

  5. JC says:

    Does this mean that as well as those south of Kingsford and east of Randwick, the residents (and workers) on and near Flinders Street (one of the most densely populated parts of Sydney) will also lose direct bus access to the CBD? (and not gain access to the light rail?).

  6. Simon says:

    Yes JC. They’ll need to walk up to Oxford St.

  7. Simon says:

    Is that 372 comment right? The doco says that it continues via Cleveland St to Railway and then as 412/413 on p131.

  8. 372 and 376 got mixed up in that table. Also, the 372 will now go via High Street, rather than Alison Road, to get to Anzac Parade. Thanks for pointing out the error. I will fix it when I get time, which I’m a bit short of at the moment.

  9. Simon says:

    So no buses will continue along Belmore Rd? I hadn’t noticed that before. How can they think that is a good idea?

  10. Express “X” and non-city bound buses (400, 314, etc) will remain on Belmore Rd

  11. MrV says:

    GregC,

    The idea of a new airport 80km from London only demonstrates one thing about Governments. That they are a bunch of fantasists.
    Firstly where is the 50 Billion pounds required going to come from. Secondly how much will you have to pay Heathrow to shut down to make that airport viable.

  12. mich says:

    I see that in your dodgy Queensland example, people are expecting to randomly turn up at point A and wait an average of 15 minutes ( anything between 1 and 29 minutes ) for a bus. Real commuters ( rather than random clueless people ) would know the timetable for a service which only runs twice an hour, and would plan accordingly. Their average wait is going to be much less than 15 minutes, and probably better than the 9 minutes they would wait ( on average ) for the two-vehicle solution.

  13. mich says:

    In this EIS document, technical paper 1, part B, can anyone explain figure 3-11 on page 117, the upper figure on the page, can anyone explain why the Surry Hills stop would have by far the largest amount of passengers boarding the light rail in the AM peak ? And why, so many of these passengers are transfering from rail or light rail ?

  14. JB says:

    I would say that Surry Hills (which would include the Devonshire St exit of Central) has the most passengers is that quite a large part of the route actually travels through SH.
    The route enters Surry Hills at the corner of Foveaux and Elizabeth Sts, turns right into Cleveland St, and remains in SH till it crosses South Dowling St, quite a few (2-3?) kms away.

    And to magnify the matter, Surry Hills is and always has been a thriving centre of activity. From the ‘rag trade’ on Kippax St, the restaurants and take away shops along the aforementioned streets, shopping centres, the pubs, the dense housing, and the many schools and colleges in the area, plenty of people travel to and from SH by public transport.

  15. JB says:

    Tje second paragraph should read:
    The route enters Surry Hills at the corner of *Wentworth Ave* and Elizabeth St, turns right into Cleveland St, and remains in SH till it crosses South Dowling St, quite a few (2-3?) kms away.

    Geography fail.

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