This week in transport (13 April 2014)

Posted: April 13, 2014 in Transport
Tags: , , ,

Monday: Federal government to pay billions in infrastructure for Badgerys Creek Airport
Billions of dollars are to be provided by the federal government for improved infrastructure for a soon to be proposed airport at Badgerys Creek. This is an increase on the initial $200m rumoured to be provided, but controversially none will be used to fund improvements to the rail network. The federal government has a policy of not funding urban rail projects, on the basis that this is a state government responsibility.

Tuesday: New Opal cards coming
Opal cards are now available for children and, for the first time, can be obtained in person at the Easter Show. Until now, the only Opal cards available were for adults and had to be obtained via the Opal website.  (TfNSW). The child Opal cards require all children to pay a separate fare, whereas currently only 1 child ticket is required for children travelling with an adult, regardless of how many children are travelling.

Child Opal cards are now available. Click to enlarge. (Source: Transport for NSW)

Child Opal cards are now available. Click to enlarge. (Source: Transport for NSW)

Pensioners will get their own Opal cards later this year, with a $2.50 daily cap on fares. However, unlike the existing Pensioner Excursion Ticket, they will not be able to be purchased from bus drivers. No details are available on when concession Opal cards for students above 16 years of age will be rolled out.

Friday: Opal rollout moves from trains to buses
Opal cards are now valid for travel to and from all train stations, on both the Sydney Trains and NSW TrainLink networks. From Monday, it will be extended to buses from the Transdev-operated Mount Kuring-gai bus depot covering bus services 556 to 599. It is currently only available on 594/594H and 333 bus routes.

Opal cards will be accepted on more buses on the North Shore from Monday 14 April. Click to enlarge. (Source: Transport for NSW)

Opal cards will be accepted on more buses on the North Shore from Monday 14 April. Click to enlarge. (Source: Transport for NSW)

Friday: Double deck trains have higher capacity than single deck trains
The ABC’s fact checking unit has declared that double deck trains have a higher capacity than single deck trains, even after taking into account the fact that single deck trains allow more trains per hour than double deck trains do. This follows claims by the NSW Premier Barry O’Farrell that it was a mistake to introduce double deck trains into Sydney and that single deck trains can carry more people per hour than double deck trains can.

Saturday: Bus depots considered for development
Bus depots at Waverly and Neutral Bay were rumoured to be considered for sale to developers for urban development. Both sites are large and close to the major centres of Bondi Junction and North Sydney. It is unclear whether the sites would be sold off entirely, or just the air rights over the depot, maintaining a functioning depot in place.

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Comments
  1. Dullsteamer says:

    “The ABC’s fact checking unit has declared that double deck trains have a higher capacity than single deck trains…”

    Well, derr! But did we really need the ABC to tell us that? Hands up anyone who is surprised that Fatty O’Barrel has been caught telling lies – again?

  2. michblogs says:

    That map would have to be one of the worst maps, ever !

    Warrawee, a bus hub ?

    Buses from Gordon to St Ives going via Pymble ?

    Turramurra and Pymble not located on the rail line ?

  3. john smith says:

    Capacity of single and double deck trains: The ABC apparently relied on a Parsons Brinckerhoff estimate that the shorter peak dwell time of single deck trains would only save 10 seconds; accordingly, capacity would be 20 per hour (double deck) and 22 per hour (single deck).

    This is unduly pessimistic. If peak dwell with two doors per cars (double deck) is about 80 seconds, then peak dwell with three doors per car (single deck) should be about 50 seconds (simple maths: 50 per cent more flow = two thirds the time; plus allowance for the fact that flow through the doors is often faster in single deck cars as people can get to and from the doors inside more easily).

    It follows that if double deck headway is about 180 seconds (20 per hour), achievable single deck headway should be about 150 seconds (24 per hour).

    Adjusting for this, single deck capacity is about the same as double deck capacity — but with a smaller proportion of seats, of course.

    Single and double deck cars have different advantages and disadvantages:

    – double deck cars are good for maximising peak period seats; but they are costly to buy and operate, and inefficient in all day operation when high capacity is not needed;

    – single deck cars are less costly to buy and operate, and give a better travel environment (higher ceilings, better sight lines, no stairs) most of the time, when max capacity is not needed; but of course at peak times a greater proportion of passengers must stand.

    The advantages and disadvantages on both sides should be evaluated properly. Capacity is not the main issue.

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